I’m writing this Sunday night and dinner tonight was a failure because I was too tired to get it right and my daughter was too tired to care about it. I was away all week training for my new job and spent about eight hours each day standing in a tiny kitchen learning to assemble food […]

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  • April 24, 2017 - 7:44 am

    Peggy Gilbey McMackin - Nancy, Wishing you a much improved week ahead, and Rachel too!ReplyCancel

  • April 24, 2017 - 9:50 pm

    Lisa @ The Meaning of Me - I totally get this. I feel insulted when one of my go-to meals doesn’t go-to. And it is usually due to tired, sick, or just in the wrong mindset to cook (that’s a thing for me). And on the larger issues, yeah, me too. We all have days that things just don’t happen the way we want, days when we feel like we’re failing at all of it (today…me). Reminding yourself that you have more successes than failures is a good thing – yay you! Hang in there…tomorrow (today?) is indeed another day, Scarlett.ReplyCancel

Knives, good ones, can be very pricey, but how many knives do you need? And do you need to most expensive ones? I have seven, but I use only four, three really, as two are paring knives. The other two are a chef’s knife and an offset serrated knife. I have a long slicing knife […]

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  • April 17, 2017 - 6:21 pm

    Peggy Gilbey MacMackin - Interesting Post Nancy. I suppose we really do all have our favorites based on need, even experience.. I have 2 chef knives, a serrated bread knife, and boning knife. I never replaced my paring knife. I hardly used it. I also have a cleaver but would like a better quality one. Thanks for sharing.ReplyCancel

After everyone goes home the quiet work of putting my house back in order begins. This work is calmer, more hushed than the frenzy of preparation. With most holidays there are at least two days of preparation just for the food. Add to that the cleaning, tidying up and readying the house for overnight guests. I’m […]

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  • April 12, 2017 - 8:41 am

    Peggy Gilbey McMackin - I never read a story that makes ironing sound so satisfying. I’ll remember that tip on removing the napkins from the dryer when they are still slightly damp next time around!!!ReplyCancel

  • April 12, 2017 - 2:40 pm

    Margaret - I loved the detailed description in this piece.ReplyCancel

    • April 12, 2017 - 7:54 pm

      nrlowell@comcast.net - Thank you. ReplyCancel

  • April 13, 2017 - 5:42 pm

    Ellen - Of all household chores, ironing is my favorite, too. Your paragraph describing the action of ironing the napkins drew me in and I was right there with you in the quiet.ReplyCancel

    • April 13, 2017 - 6:33 pm

      nrlowell@comcast.net - Thanks Ellen!ReplyCancel

Seders traditionally begin with the youngest person at the table asking the Four Questions, starting with “Why is this night different from all other nights of the year?” Tonight is the first night of Passover, but my semi-observant family had our Seder Saturday night. We spend two holidays a year together; Passover and Thanksgiving. This […]

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  • April 10, 2017 - 9:29 am

    Margaret - Thanks for sharing this. Food and gatherings evoke so many memories. You made me hungry for gefilte fish and matzo ball soup!ReplyCancel

  • April 10, 2017 - 10:20 am

    Peggy Gilbey McMackin - Happy you and your family enjoyed a special Seder together. I did a homemade gefilte fish preparation with a woman a few years back. Labor intensive but fun and interesting. Your salmon and the rest of your meal sound delicious. Blessings in the time of the Passover.ReplyCancel

  • April 14, 2017 - 1:48 pm

    Parri Sontag - Our cantor held a cooking class this year, where she shared her family’s salmon gefilte fish and horseradish dill sauce. It was a yummy and interesting twist!ReplyCancel

    • April 14, 2017 - 2:03 pm

      nrlowell@comcast.net - I used to buy salmon gefilte fish at Whole Foods. I have never made it.ReplyCancel

Despite what some people think, I can drive, I’ve been doing it for years, but men seem to struggle with this notion. What is it about men that makes them want to help us with things like driving? Is it chivalry or sexism? Is it kindness or condescension? Whatever it is my reaction to it […]

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  • April 5, 2017 - 9:07 am

    Peggy Gilbey McMackin - As for me, I would be grateful for the caring connection simply waving, smiling, or saying thank you. It makes people feel good to do something for others, and I would never view any consideration as questioning my ability, including good manners for something simple as opening or holding a door.ReplyCancel

    • April 5, 2017 - 9:09 am

      nrlowell@comcast.net - I suppose you’re right, I may need to update my attitude 🙂
      ReplyCancel

  • April 5, 2017 - 1:21 pm

    Lisa @ The Meaning of Me - I get where you’re coming from. But. I suspect they honestly think they’re being helpful, not condescending. I see the construction guys near us wave drivers around all the time – men and women. I do find it a bit distracting – hard for me to process and trust another driver because I learned NEVER to trust anyone but yourself when you’re driving. But. It’s human connection and helpful, I think.
    Meanwhile, parallel parking and stick shift are impressive when ANYONE can do them. 😀 Lost skills if you ask me.
    Just saw on your Twitter profile that you’re in Philadelphia – we are practically neighbors. Who knew???ReplyCancel

    • April 5, 2017 - 1:44 pm

      nrlowell@comcast.net - No kidding!! Where are you?
      ReplyCancel

  • April 6, 2017 - 2:20 pm

    Rowan - There are SO MANY studies that show that women have superior spatial sense (which leads to a better sense of where your car is, which leads to better driving). They’re also significantly better at things like *being a fighter pilot* soooooo.ReplyCancel

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